jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Science Needs Women: 
For Women in Science; the L’Oreal Foundation 

I’m sharing this video on any platform I can because when I first found it last week it had something like 1,400 views, but it’s the most beautifully produced and succinctly narrated video addressing some of the most complicated issues facing women in STE(A)M fields I’ve found yet. 

I’m sharing this for every time I’m called a “feminazi.”

…for every time I’m told that my concerns aren’t valid, our that our issues are imagined.

…for every time I hear “women just don’t like science,” or worse - “women just aren’t good at science.”

…for every time we’re told that we can have a family or a career, but not both - and for every time we feel like we have to decide between the two.

…for every time a study comes out saying as many as 64% of women endure sexual harassment during field work

…for the fact that women earn 41% of PhD’s in STEM fields, but make up only 28% of tenure-track faculty in those fields.

…and because we need more women mentors in these fields to stand up for issues that are not “women’s issues” - these are people issues that affect our collective society as a whole.

The women in this video are my heroes and they should be your heroes, too.

Science needs women.

"Success is being able to look in the mirror and know that I am all right on that day. I don’t believe I’ve made it. I believe that I’m making it. I believe that I found my past so I can live in the present. It’s the most important thing to me. In the books and the plays and the touring and the gigs and the speeches and the – and the cash – it all pales into insignificance when compared with knowing that I didn’t do anything wrong. And I’m OK now."

In a fantastic episode of NPR’s TED Radio Hour, poet Lemn Sissay echoes Thoreau.

Complement with 5½ excellent commencement addresses on defining your own success.

(via explore-blog)

explore-blog:

Joe Hanson of It’s Okay To Be Smart breaks down the science of the smell of rain. Also see Hanson (with help from Picasso) on the science of dust.

archatlas:

Rowing High Performance Centre Alvaro Andrade

Images by: FG+SGArchitectural Photography and Joao Morgado

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve had to run from war twice. Both times I left good jobs behind, and it was very painful. The second time was the worst. I thought I’d escaped a hopeless situation, and then it happened again. You can feel when war is coming to your town. Traffic picks up. People’s faces begin to look very worried. Nobody cares for each other. If someone talks to you, you can tell that they want the conversation to end as soon as possible. The second time I had to run, I thought: ‘This time I have to get as far away as possible.’ So I came all the way to Kinshasa.""Were you worried the war would reach Kinshasa?""No. Because the wars have all been about Kinshasa. So if the war reaches Kinshasa, the war is over."(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve had to run from war twice. Both times I left good jobs behind, and it was very painful. The second time was the worst. I thought I’d escaped a hopeless situation, and then it happened again. You can feel when war is coming to your town. Traffic picks up. People’s faces begin to look very worried. Nobody cares for each other. If someone talks to you, you can tell that they want the conversation to end as soon as possible. The second time I had to run, I thought: ‘This time I have to get as far away as possible.’ So I came all the way to Kinshasa."
"Were you worried the war would reach Kinshasa?"
"No. Because the wars have all been about Kinshasa. So if the war reaches Kinshasa, the war is over."
(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

brilliantbotany:

The tomatoes in my garden are growing! Have you ever wondered where the smell of tomato plants comes from? They’re actually covered in tiny spikes called trichomes, which contain a yellow substance that produces that characteristic smell.
Photo by brilliantbotany. 
[Source]

brilliantbotany:

The tomatoes in my garden are growing! Have you ever wondered where the smell of tomato plants comes from? They’re actually covered in tiny spikes called trichomes, which contain a yellow substance that produces that characteristic smell.

Photo by brilliantbotany.

[Source]

(Source: darkhard)

ilovecharts:

Whatever you do, do it thoughtfully.
Today, Jessica wonders why germaphobes hate water parks.

ilovecharts:

Whatever you do, do it thoughtfully.

Today, Jessica wonders why germaphobes hate water parks.

archatlas:

Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building Kengo Kuma & Associates

archatlas:

Peter Rush