Sorted Books

The Art Assigment 13:

We’ve only lived at our current address for a few months so I don’t know anyone well enough to invade their library. Also we don’t have access to all our books so these are books we’ve accumulated over the past few years. 

We love food.

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(When will broccoli taste like chocolate? Real snacks, at home.)

And being healthy. 

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(Complementary and alternative medicine: Violent python, Mums know best!, go play outside!)

I cheated a little and used a deck of cards.

We love reading…

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(A natural history of dragons: the never ending story. The Portable door. The wide carnivorous sky: a cautionary tale.)

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(Grimm tales. Blood alone, at the mouth of the river of bees.)

And writing…

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(Thinking fast and slow about writing the neverending story.)

And history. 

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(Confessions of an economic hit man, swiss history in a nutshell.)

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(A history of Korea: come in, we’re closed.)

It’s good to know how to protect yourself…

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(The art of intelligence: how to tell if your cat is plotting to kill you.)

And how to dress well. 

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(Fashion 101. Chromophobia and confusion.)

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(10 steps to fashion freedom: Fashion 101. Paper Doll Primer. The elements of style. Chromophobia. Heads, features and faces. The colour of magic. Fix-it-yourself. Get out of your mind and into your life. F**k it.) 

I also made one on my kindle which is mostly filled with free books. 

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(The Story of My Life. The Pink Fairy book. The Winter’s Tale. Les Miserables. Night and Day. Debt: The First 5,000 Years. You Learn by Living. Sense and Sensibility. A Room of One’s Own. As You Like It.) 

ilovetocollectart:

Marc Chagall - La fenetre sur l’ll de Brehat, 1924

ilovetocollectart:

Marc Chagall - La fenetre sur l’ll de Brehat, 1924

(via heaveninawildflower)

temploculturaldelfos:

O violinista azul, de Marc Chagall - 1947

temploculturaldelfos:

O violinista azul, de Marc Chagall - 1947

(via heaveninawildflower)

(x)

(Source: ourdrunkitchen, via mydrunkkitchen)

jeannepompadour:

"Woman using the ship" by Boucher, 1760s

jeannepompadour:

"Woman using the ship" by Boucher, 1760s

MisSpelled

Great project to support on Kickstarter: MisSpelled!

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1320123977/misspelled-a-fantastical-witchy-web-series

The Little Merboy Part 4 of 4

womantoman:

Adapted from http://www.andersenstories.com/en/andersen_fairy-tales/the_little_mermaid

So he passed quickly through the wood and the marsh and between the rushing whirlpools. He saw that in his mother’s palace the torches in the ballroom were extinguished and all within asleep. But he did not venture to go in to them, for now he was dumb and going to leave them forever. He felt as if his heart would break. He stole into the garden, took a flower from the flower-beds of each of his brothers, kissed his hand a thousand times towards the palace and then rose up through the dark blue waters. The sun had not risen when he came in sight of the princess’s palace and approached the beautiful marble steps but the moon shone clear and bright. Then the little merboy drank the magic draught and it seemed as if a two-edged sword went through his delicate body: he fell into a swoon and lay like one dead. When the sun arose and shone over the sea he recovered and felt a sharp pain but just before him stood the handsome young princess. She fixed her coal-black eyes upon him so earnestly that he cast down his own and then became aware that his fish’s tail was gone and that he had as pretty a pair of white legs and tiny feet as any little boy could have but he had no clothes, so he wrapped himself in his long, thick hair. The princess asked him who he was and where he came from and he looked at her mildly and sorrowfully with his deep blue eyes but he could not speak. Every step he took was as the witch had said it would be, he felt as if he was treading upon the points of needles or sharp knives but he bore it willingly and stepped as lightly by the princess’s side as a soap-bubble so that she and all who saw him wondered at his graceful-swaying movements. He was soon arrayed in costly robes of silk and muslin and was the most beautiful creature in the palace but he was dumb and could neither speak nor sing.

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thebrainscoop:

Remember Martha, the last of her kind, who died on this day a century ago. September 1st marks the extinction of the passenger pigeon, a species of North American bird with incomparable population numbers before they were completely eradicated by humans at the beginning of the 20th century. 
3.7 billion to 0 in forty years.
And if you are wishing this wouldn’t happen again, hoping that history doesn’t repeat itself - remember that we are currently enduring the sixth major mass extinction event. While the other five in our earth’s history were naturally caused by everything from major meteoritic impacts, to extreme cooling or warming of the environment, and frequently changing atmosphere - the latest event, Number Six, is being completely attributed to humans. This is the Holocene Extinction. 
In 2012 the IUCN reported that 30% of amphibians are at risk of extinction; as well as 21% of mammals, reptiles, and fish, 12% of birds, 68% of plants. We are looking to lose 30-50% of all species of life on our planet by the middle of the century. 
This may feel like a hopeless inevitability, but the future is not set in stone. What we need for this cause is awareness. What we need is an investment of personal interest. We need voices, and students, and teachers. We need scientists, and law makers, and committees and new legislation for the environment. We need communicators. We need enthusiasts and what we really need is to ruin apathy. This is a shared planet, not just between ourselves but with every miraculous piece of life that has erupted on its unlikely surface in the last billion years. We owe it to that great improbability not to mess this up. 

thebrainscoop:

Remember Martha, the last of her kind, who died on this day a century ago. September 1st marks the extinction of the passenger pigeon, a species of North American bird with incomparable population numbers before they were completely eradicated by humans at the beginning of the 20th century.

3.7 billion to 0 in forty years.

And if you are wishing this wouldn’t happen again, hoping that history doesn’t repeat itself - remember that we are currently enduring the sixth major mass extinction event. While the other five in our earth’s history were naturally caused by everything from major meteoritic impacts, to extreme cooling or warming of the environment, and frequently changing atmosphere - the latest event, Number Six, is being completely attributed to humans. This is the Holocene Extinction. 

In 2012 the IUCN reported that 30% of amphibians are at risk of extinction; as well as 21% of mammals, reptiles, and fish, 12% of birds, 68% of plants. We are looking to lose 30-50% of all species of life on our planet by the middle of the century.

This may feel like a hopeless inevitability, but the future is not set in stone. What we need for this cause is awareness. What we need is an investment of personal interest. We need voices, and students, and teachers. We need scientists, and law makers, and committees and new legislation for the environment. We need communicators. We need enthusiasts and what we really need is to ruin apathy. This is a shared planet, not just between ourselves but with every miraculous piece of life that has erupted on its unlikely surface in the last billion years. We owe it to that great improbability not to mess this up. 

(via animalwondersmontana)

rubyetc:

dem eyebrows

rubyetc:

dem eyebrows

(via rubyetc)

archiemcphee:

Colossal, the Department of Incredible Insects recently encountered more photos of the fascinating work of French artist Hubert Duprat and his industrious Caddisflies (previously featured here).

"Right now, in almost every river in the world, some 12,000 different species of caddisfly larvae wriggle and crawl through sediment, twigs, and rocks in an attempt to build temporary aquatic cocoons. To do this, the small, slow-moving creatures excrete silk from salivary glands near their mouths which they use like mortar to stick together almost every available material into a cozy tube. A few weeks later a fully developed caddisfly emerges and almost immediately flies away."

Since the 1980s Duprat has been collecting caddisfly larvae from their normal environments and transporting them to aquariums in his studio. There he gently removes their own natural cocoons and puts the larvae in tanks filled with materials such as pearls, beads, opals, turquoise and pieces of 18-karat gold. The insects still do exactly what comes naturally to them, but in doing so they create exquisite gilded sculptures that they temporarily call home. If you saw them out of context, you’d never guess they’d been created insects.

Visit Colossal for additional images and video of Hubert Duprat discussing these amazing insects and their shiny, shiny creations.

(via downlo)