timballisto said: I'm writing a paper about the internalized racism in Shakespeare's Othello. Do you have any good sources about the Elizabethan interactions with people of color that can give me some context for this play? I asked my professor but he gave me the "there were no african peoples (Moors or otherwise) in England in this time period" spiel, but I'm sensing bullshit. Thank you!

medievalpoc:

medievalpoc:

thirddeadlysin:

medievalpoc:

Uhhhhh.

Okay well your professor lied to you.

Actually there were so many Black British at that time that Elizabeth I tried to blame the realms ills on them and have them all deported. Twice. She failed, probably because you can’t deport your own citizens very well under most circumstances. It’s actually a pretty pivotal point in English history.

Here’s one of the letters from her own hand:

image

[transcript]

An open le[tt]re to the L[ord] Maiour of London and th’alermen his brethren, And to all other Maiours, Sheryfes, &c. Her Ma[jes]tieunderstanding that there are of late divers Blackmoores brought into the Realme, of which kinde of people there are all ready here to manie,consideringe howe God hath blessed this land w[i]th great increase of people of our owne Nation as anie Countrie in the world, wherof manie for want of Service and meanes to sett them on worck fall to Idlenesse and to great extremytie; Her Ma[jesty’]s pleasure therefore ys, that those kinde of people should be sent forthe of the lande. And for that purpose there ys direction given to this bearer Edwarde Banes to take of those Blackmoores that in this last voyage under Sir Thomas Baskervile, were brought into this Realme to the nomber of Tenn, to be Transported by him out of the Realme. Wherein wee Req[uire] you to be aydinge & Assysting unto him as he shall have occacion, and thereof not to faile.

You can read another one in its entirety here.

Elizabeth I tried to use Black British as scapegoats for some of the problems in English society during the Elizabethan Era, problems that led to the passing of the famous Poor Laws in 1597 and 1601.

From The British National Archives:

But while Elizabeth may have enjoyed being entertained by Black people, in the 1590s she also issued proclamations against them. In 1596 she wrote to the lord mayors of major cities noting that there were ‘of late divers blackmoores brought into this realm, of which kind of people there are already here to manie…’. She ordered that ‘those kinde of people should be sente forth of the land’.

Elizabeth made an arrangement for a merchant, Casper van Senden, to deport Black people from England in 1596. The aim seems to have been to exchange them for (or perhaps to sell them to obtain funds to buy) English prisoners held by England’s Catholic enemies Spain and Portugal.

No doubt van Senden intended to sell these people. But this was not to be, because masters* of Black workers - who had not been offered compensation - refused to let them go. In 1601, Elizabeth issued a further proclamation expressing her ‘discontentment by the numbers of blackamores which are crept into this realm…’ and again licensing van Senden to deport Black people. It is doubtful whether this second proclamation was any more successful than the first.

Why this sudden, urgent desire to expel members of England’s Black population? It was more than a commercial transaction pursued by the queen. In the 16th century, the ruling classes became increasingly concerned about poverty and vagrancy, as the feudal system- which, in theory, had kept everyone in their place - finally broke down. They feared disorder and social breakdown and, blaming the poor, brought in poor laws to try to deal with the problem

As you can see, Black people were a pretty important and pivotal part of English society at the time. Basically, the Queen tried to convince the people that they had to “give up” their cobbler’s apprentices and weavers and other various other workingpeople (the Black musicians in the court were of course exempt from the deportations) to the crown, on the basis that they were “vagrants” and “mostly infidels”. This was not only a wild exaggeration (most were Christian with working class jobs like ya do), but it’s not a very compelling reason to frigging report your next-door neighbor Bill the Mason to immigration. Because then who’s going to do your masonry?

So anyways, the Poor Laws had to be passed, because you can’t deport your citizens/workforce and no one would cooperate with something like that.

And it’s not like those people went anywhere. They’re still there. They were there before that! Some had been there since like, the 4th frigging century when that was part of the Roman Empire!

Also check the tag for England here. Plenty more on lots of different people of color in England throughout many eras.

* this generally refers to the “master” of a workshop or guildmaster, not necessarily the master of an enslaved person, FYI.

oh my god how is this something i never learned about in three separate elizabethan era-focused classes??? (no need to answer; i know how) 

Three? Three?

Like, I thought my capacity to be disappointed in history education was full, but I guess not.

Seriously, the next time someone sends a message about how this is stuff “everyone knows” remind me to link this.

Reblogging this for the last five people who asked me if there are enough people who don’t know that POC lived in Europe in the past to “justify” Medievalpoc’s existence….

Because sometimes those people are your professor. Or someone who took three Elizabethan Era focused classes. Because I think everyone should know these things, whether you’re a history fan or not.

"It’s offensive because it’s a barrier."

A woman gets to the point during a conversation about partitions in mosques. (via sideentrance)

exhibition-ism:

Silhouette street art by Sam3 in Bari, Italy. 

ilovecharts:

Ok, let’s get back to wages.

The earnings gap between men and women still exists today, but since the 1970’s:

  1. Women’s hourly earnings have grown more quickly than men’s, following a similar trend to GDP growth.
  2. Growth in median family income has largely come from increases in women’s earnings, rather than from men’s earnings.
  3. Earnings for both married and single mothers increased by about 33%.
  4. Married mothers’ contributions to total family income increased from less than one-third to about 40%.

In other words, women are bringing home more of the bacon, but we still have more work to do to ensure equal pay for equal work.

sosuperawesome:

Nokkasili, on Tumblr

medievalpoc:

For those of you who’ve asked how you can support Medievalpoc:
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Patronage will provide the opportunity to not only bring Medievalpoc to a wider audience online, but the ability to travel for appearances at academic and literary conventions, speak at functions, and facilitate activist work in face-to-face environments. Patronage means more access to databases, art collections, and academic resources for the creation of Medievalpoc. In addition, your patronage can pave the way for exciting new projects across various media, like print, film, and interactive online content—projects Patrons can see in the making.I look forward to forging a new era of Patron and Creator with my readers in my goal of bringing Art and History to life in a new way-a History in which we can see ourselves.

medievalpoc:

For those of you who’ve asked how you can support Medievalpoc:

Become a Medievalpoc Patron!

Medievalpoc is a collection of art, history, and academic resources accessible to anyone. Ph.D. candidates, history educators, fantasy authors, fans of historical media and cultural studies, as well as those who are just interested in learning something different have found new and exciting information at Medievalpoc. These artworks and documentation are readily available on multiple social media platforms, including Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter, and Medievalpoc.org. The goal of Medievalpoc is not to hoard information, but to share it as widely as possible and incite discussion in social as well as activist and educational communities.

Patronage will provide the opportunity to not only bring Medievalpoc to a wider audience online, but the ability to travel for appearances at academic and literary conventions, speak at functions, and facilitate activist work in face-to-face environments. Patronage means more access to databases, art collections, and academic resources for the creation of Medievalpoc. In addition, your patronage can pave the way for exciting new projects across various media, like print, film, and interactive online content—projects Patrons can see in the making.

I look forward to forging a new era of Patron and Creator with my readers in my goal of bringing Art and History to life in a new way-a History in which we can see ourselves.

(via medievalpoc)

sosuperawesome:

Takmaj, on Tumblr

Shop

ilovecharts:

Ok, so things are improving on many fronts when it comes to women in the workforce, but we’re slipping compared to other countries when it comes to female labor force participation.
Since 1990, the U.S. has dropped from 7th to 16th in that category among advanced democracies—that’s in the bottom third. In fact, we’re the only developed country that does not guarantee paid maternity leave.
But with the right policy changes, we can jump back up the leaderboard and help expand opportunity for millions of women. Paid leave and other policies that enable workers to better balance work and family obligations could help boost female labor force participation. One study estimated that U.S. female labor force participation would be 6.8 percentage points higher if the U.S. had implemented a suite of family-friendly policies. (cc Republicans in Congress)

ilovecharts:

Ok, so things are improving on many fronts when it comes to women in the workforce, but we’re slipping compared to other countries when it comes to female labor force participation.

Since 1990, the U.S. has dropped from 7th to 16th in that category among advanced democracies—that’s in the bottom third. In fact, we’re the only developed country that does not guarantee paid maternity leave.

But with the right policy changes, we can jump back up the leaderboard and help expand opportunity for millions of women. Paid leave and other policies that enable workers to better balance work and family obligations could help boost female labor force participation. One study estimated that U.S. female labor force participation would be 6.8 percentage points higher if the U.S. had implemented a suite of family-friendly policies. (cc Republicans in Congress)

archatlas:

Classic Chinese Ancient Buildings Cutaways Li Ganlang [via]

"Li Ganlang 2005 onwards started drawing, anatomical drawings to show the Chinese construction Shi Jingdian construction law, showing Chinese cultural characteristics of various buildings, covered wood constitutive temples, pavilions, towers, gates, caves, bridges, houses and so on five Shiyu Zuo building. By Yuan-Liou Publishing Company."

ilovecharts:

Here’s the bottom line: We’re making progress, but the gender pay gap still exists at all income levels, and widens as people get older.
Highly-educated women with professional degrees tend to begin their careers at approximately the same salary level as their male counterparts, but as their careers progress, a gender gap opens up. By their late 30’s, men with professional degrees earn 50% more than their female counterparts.
So how do we fix that? Beginning with the first bill he signed into law, President Obama’s been fighting to help women receive the pay they deserve. But he can’t do it all by himself. Congress needs to act to help ensure equal pay for women.
That’s all for today! I hope you enjoyed our charts. I had a blast. —Betsey

ilovecharts:

Here’s the bottom line: We’re making progress, but the gender pay gap still exists at all income levels, and widens as people get older.

Highly-educated women with professional degrees tend to begin their careers at approximately the same salary level as their male counterparts, but as their careers progress, a gender gap opens up. By their late 30’s, men with professional degrees earn 50% more than their female counterparts.

So how do we fix that? Beginning with the first bill he signed into law, President Obama’s been fighting to help women receive the pay they deserve. But he can’t do it all by himself. Congress needs to act to help ensure equal pay for women.

That’s all for today! I hope you enjoyed our charts. I had a blast. —Betsey