Snow White and Rose Red

womantoman:

Adapted from  http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~spok/grimmtmp/122.txt

There was once a poor widower who lived in a lonely cottage.  In front of the cottage was a garden wherein stood two rose-trees, one of which bore white and the other red roses.  He had two children who were like the two rose-trees, and one was called snow-white, and the other rose-red.  They were as good and happy, as busy and cheerful as ever two children in the world were, only snow-white was more quiet and gentle than rose-red.

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The Twelve Sisters

womantoman:

Adapted from http://classiclit.about.com/library/bl-etexts/grimm/bl-grimm-12brothers.htm

There were once on a time a queen and a king who lived happily together and had twelve children, but they were all girls. Then said the Queen to her husband, “If the thirteenth child which I am about to bring into the world is a boy, the twelve girls shall die in order that his possessions may be great and that the kingdom may fall to him alone. She caused likewise twelve coffins to be made, which were already filled with shavings and in each lay the little pillow for the dead. She had them taken into a locked-up room and then she gave the King the key of it and bade him not to speak of this to anyone.

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The Fisher and Her Husband

womantoman:

Adapted from   http://www.authorama.com/grimms-fairy-tales-10.html

There was once a fisher who lived with her husband in a pigsty, close by the seaside. The fisher used to go out all day long a-fishing; and one day, as she sat on the shore with her rod, looking at the sparkling wave and watching her line, all on a sudden her float was dragged away deep into the water and in drawing it up she pulled out a great fish. But the fish said, “Pray let me live! I am not a real fish; I am an enchanted princess: put me in the water again and let me go.” “Oh, ho”, said the woman, “you need not make so many words about the matter; I will have nothing to do with a fish that can talk: so swim away ma’am as soon as you please!” Then she put her back into the water and the fish darted straight down to the bottom and left a long streak of blood behind her on the wave.

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The Shoes that were Danced to Pieces

womantoman:

Adapted from http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0306.html#grimm

Once upon a time there was a Queen who had twelve sons, each one more beautiful than the others. Their beds were all together in one room, and when they went to bed, their doors were all locked and barred but the next morning their shoes were always danced to pieces and no one knew where they had been or how it had happened. Then the Queen proclaimed that whoever could discover where they went dancing each night could choose one of them for her husband and become Queen after her death. However, anyone who attempted this but failed to make the discovery after three days and nights would forfeit her life.

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childrenmilk:

speak gurl this is real

(Source: stand-up-comic-gifs, via butmyopinionisright)

explore-blog:

The great Jeanette Winterson on time, writing, and the purpose of art in human life

explore-blog:

The great Jeanette Winterson on time, writing, and the purpose of art in human life

"You are a unique person and you have to be yourself. You can’t be anybody else; you can’t lead anybody else’s life. You have to be comfortable in your own skin and you have to be confident about who you are, whether you’re working at Twitter or running for office. And that is hard to do….and yet it’s all doable once you relax and decide, ‘You know what? This is no dress rehearsal. This is it for me. I want to be who I am.’ You be yourself. Easiest advice to say, hardest advice to follow."

Hillary Clinton, in response to a tweet from Amy Poehler (x).

(via stamatinafeys)

(via butmyopinionisright)

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

"

You’re probably not getting enough sleep, but you might not be as far off the mark as you think. Most sleep experts would offer that aiming for between seven to nine hours of snooze time a night is optimal for feeling refreshed and productive the next day. In a new report, however … researchers are closing in on what may just be that magic nightly number—and it’s not nine hours, or even eight as once believed… it’s seven hours of sleep.

The usual caveats apply, and these findings should be taken with a grain of salt. But the results are interesting—especially if you’re the kind of person who struggles with sluggishness throughout the day.

"The lowest mortality and morbidity is with seven hours," [says] Shawn Youngstedt, a professor in the College of Nursing and Health Innovation at Arizona State University Phoenix… "Eight hours or more has consistently been shown to be hazardous."

"

Intriguing new study on the optimal amount of sleep. But that grain of salt can’t be overstated given the wide variation of “chronotypes” and internal time.

Also see the science of what actually happens while you sleep and how it affects your every waking moment.

(via explore-blog)

(Source: namastetoyoutoo, via mydrunkkitchen)